Is NoSQL still a thing?

G’day,

Looking back, perhaps one of the (many) mistakes that I’ve made in my career was to initially ignore the N0SQL movement.

I’ve focused my career on Relational Database systems – predominantly Microsoft SQL Server – and so using a NoSQL database felt ‘wrong’, for a number of reasons.

Firstly, the name itself – NoSQL – felt like the message was that the SQL language was in someway being “devalued” and ‘kicked to the kerb”

Secondly, the lack of transaction support in NoSQL databases also felt wrong. I assumed SQL implied relational.

I think now-a-days it’s probably better to think of SQL as simply a language to manipulate data (SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE etc). (Event if this is a deviation from the technical ANSI definition) Nearly all vendors have their own propriety extensions (Microsoft have T-SQL, Oracle have PL/SQL, Sybase also have T-SQL but it is diverging from the Microsoft language of the same name where it originally has its roots) and pure ANSI standard SQL is hard to find.

We see lots of database (relational or not) using derivatives of SQL.

We also see relational databases using non-relational functionality and non-relational databases starting to use relational functionality.

And so, both relational and non-relational have their place in today’s world and so I wonder how long the term NoSQL will continue to be used.

Quite sometime ago I started to look at CosmosDB – which a lot of people still talk about in 2020 as being the ‘new kid on the block’ – but it’s been evolving for 10 years now and is gaining a good foothold in the market.

If you’ve not seem it before it would be worth a look and although it shares some familiar terms with relational database it is not one and approaching it with the same mindset may land you in a mess – but once you start to get to grips with how it operates and the different models it employs I think it’ll start to grow on you.

Have a great day.

Cheers

Martin.

Generating Insert Statements

G’day,

I been asked a few times lately the best way to generate INSERT statements.

I’d always replied to use SSMS.

I know SSMS has this feature, it’s just not something that I have the need to use on a regular basic. And – as we all know – when you don’t use something regularly you tend to forget where to find it, or – as happens reasonably regularly nowadays – the feature, or tool, gets an update and you find yourself re-learning something you thought that you were already familiar with.

Fortunately, the feature to generate INSERT statements was pretty much where I expected – but it did take a few minutes to find the exact spot, so I thought that I’d mention it here – just in case anybody else is looking too, or you just need a reminder that SSMS is very capable of performing this task.

Simply right click on the database that contains the table – or tables – that you need to generate INSERT statements for and select TASKS

Select TASKS

From the resulting menu choose GENERATE SCRIPTS

Select Generate Scripts

Then it’s just a simply case of following the Wizard through.

If you’ve not started this Wizard before then you’ll see the Introduction page – you can safely tick “Don’t show this page again”, so you basically don’t see this page again the next time you start the same Wizard.

You probably don’t want to see this page every time you start the Wizard.

Then, on the next page, either select either all objects to script – or just the specific one(s) that you want. In my case I’m interested in one particular table.

Select the object(s) that you want to script.

On the next page select the location where you want the file to go. I’m selecting a new query editor window, but you could select a file location or the clipboard.

Then hit the “Advanced” button

Selecting the Advanced button is important

Clicking the Advanced button will show the “Advanced Scripting Options” – scroll down until you find “Types of data to script” and select your choice from the drop down. I’ve chose to script “Schema and data” – but you can also select just Data or only schema.

Select the option that best suits your need.

The next page will give you a summary

Hit Next on the summary page

The it’s just a case of hitting Next and then your script is generated. Simply hit finish on the next screen

You’ll see a summary and hit Finish

And you should see your script. Save it to a location of your choice.

Finally – you see your nice INSERT script

I hope this was useful.

Have a great day

Cheers

Marty.